Mental Health in the Workplace: Rights and Responsibilities of Youth with Disabilities

by the Cerebral Palsy Association of British Columbia

Are you a Youth living with Disabilities who is confused about topics such as Workplace Disclosure and Accommodations?

The Cerebral Palsy Association of BC is pleased to announce their upcoming series of legal workshops “Rights and Responsibilities of Youth with Disabilities”.

Why?

As a community, we have witnessed firsthand that youth with cerebral palsy and other disabilities already face significant difficulties in securing employment. A common barrier is the confusion that surrounds workplace procedures such as disclosures and accommodations. Though the BC Human Rights Code serves to protect youth in the workplace, we realized that the provision of safe spaces and legal expertise for youth to have discussions about joining the workforce is necessary and important.

On top of those barriers, youth with disabilities are disproportionately affected by mental health issues such as anxiety and depression, preventing them from fully participating in the workforce. Young people who participate in the Choices in Supports for Independent Living (CSIL) program and hire their own caregivers also require insight and understanding of an employers’ role and obligations.

Knowledge is empowerment

We have responded to this need by inviting legal experts to explore the topics of disclosure, accommodations and other related workplace topics in a series of workshops. These workshops are open to youth living with disabilities, their caregivers and other interested community members. We hope that access to legal expertise that caters to youth living with disabilities can support and empower them to join the workforce on an equal basis with other citizens.

At the Cerebral Palsy Association of BC, our vision is to create a Life without Limits for people living with disabilities and this includes the ability to seek employment and financial stability. We would love for you to join us!

Find more details here.

Stay Informed with Cerebral Palsy Association of British Columbia:

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August 2018 Events (BC-wide)

Bookmark this post! It will be updated as more events are announced. You can also get frequent updates via our Twitter. Have a suggestion? Email us.

  • Thursday, August 9 (7:00 – 8:30 pm): People’s Law School presents a workshop on Wills and Estates at Burnaby Public Library – Tommy Douglas Branch.

Make sure your estate will be distributed according to your wishes. Learn how to prepare a will, including the legal requirements, what you should include in your will, and what happens if you die without a will. Get more information and register online here.

  • Friday, August 24 (3:45 – 6:00 pm): Cerebral Palsy Association of BC presents the first of a workshop series titled Mental Health in the Workplace: Rights and Responsibilities of Youth with Disabilities at the Richmond Centre for Disability, Richmond.

This workshop series will address the issues of mental health in the workplace for youth with disabilities. The workshops will be given by two lawyers. To register for these workshops contact Denzil at programs@bccerebralpalsy.com or call 604-408-9484. Get more information here.

Stay informed:

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Protect your personal data

By Mark Abbott, Courthouse Libraries BC – Information Services

Google Home Assistant

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a new global standard for privacy law, came into effect on May 25, 2018. The GDPR gives citizens of the European Union (EU) more control over their personal information and how organizations all over the world can use their data. The regulation is far-reaching, applicable to Canadian organizations if they offer goods and services to and/or monitor the behaviour of EU citizens.

This new law comes at an interesting time as news stories circulate of large data breaches in both the public and private sectors. Our lives are inextricably intertwined with and operating in the digital ether. One example of this is the growing adoption of “Smart Home Technology”. Smart Home Technology allows various types of devices to connect to the internet, to offer automation services that either provide convenience, efficiency, and/or security.

In this new world of opportunity, how can we protect our personal data? We consulted BC and Canadian privacy and security experts for tips on how you can take preventive measures against having your data stolen and some precautions to take with smart home technology.

What is Smart Home Technology?

Smart Home Technology includes devices connected to the internet that exchange data with each other, commonly referred to as the “Internet of Things,” or IoT. Examples range from dimmer light switches, monitored thermostats, wireless speaker systems, to smartphones, Amazon Echo (powered by Alexa) and Google Home.

Precautions and Awareness

Before you start using smart home technology, there are some important considerations, according to Vincent Gogolek, former executive director of the BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association (BC FIPA). “The first precaution should be to look at whether the convenience offered by a particular device is of real use to you compared to the potential downside risks,” he says. “Does your toaster really need to be connected to the internet?”

In terms of awareness, Vincent suggests we keep ourselves informed about features we might not even realize are a potential problem. “Microphones that allow voice commands are able to record everything that goes on in that room, and it is often unclear when recording is on, how long it is stored, where it is shared and what may be done with the personal information it collects.”

Practical steps to protect yourself

Former Ontario Information and Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian is a vocal and tireless advocate for data security and safeguarding our personal information. We spoke with Dr. Cavoukian about some practical steps you can take to protect yourself.

“At this point in time, refrain from bringing these connected devices into your home,” she says. “Your home is your last bastion of privacy and these devices completely erode that.” Dr. Cavoukian believes that in the wake of the GDPR coming into effect, there’s a better chance we’ll have greater protection.

If you simply can’t wait to have that Amazon Echo or smart refrigerator in your home, “you have to, unfortunately, read the Terms of Service these companies provide,” she cautions–even if those service agreements remain long and tedious–particularly if you want to know how your information is stored and used by third parties. Equipping yourself with this knowledge helps you make an informed decision as to whether or not you want to engage with the technology.

Learn more about your privacy rights

Clicklaw has a couple of resources available on the above topics:

  • The Internet of ThingsFrom the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, this introduction to privacy issues – with a focus on the retail and home environments – is a handy starter guide. You can read the entire guide on the webpage or download it as a pdf.
  • Get Cyber Safe – Cyber Security RisksFrom the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness site “Get Cyber Safe”: The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to physical devices (smart/connected devices) that connect to each other via the internet. This website helps you understand how to protect your privacy and security if you are using them at home. It also has a section for small/medium business owners.

Suggested Reading

BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association (BC FIPA) published their report “Connected Cars” in the spring of 2015. Be on the lookout, as BC FIPA’s new executive director, Sara Neuert, said an updated report will likely be published by early fall. Read the report here.

Stay informed:

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New Online Divorce “App”

This morning, the BC Ministry of Attorney General announced the new Online Divorce Assistant Application. This new online tool will assist people in BC to finalize divorces. It is intended to speed up processing times and to help get rid of filing errors.

Who is it for (currently)?

Applicants who:

The new Online Divorce Assistant Application
  • agree on all family law issues applicable to them – such as spousal support, and dividing family property and debt(s);
  • do not have dependent children; and
  • who intend to “joint-file” their divorces (work together, in cooperation, to get the job done).

Currently, 30% of the 10,000 divorces filed every year in BC are filed jointly.

How do I use the App?

You can use the Online Divorce Assistant on any smartphone or computer, but it is ideally viewed on devices that are at least tablet-sized. It takes about 15-30 minutes to complete.

What does the App do?

Once you go through the app and answer all its questions, you can print out the finished documents and take them to a BC Supreme Court registry for filing.

Will the App change over time?

According to the Ministry, “Plans are underway to expand the Online Divorce Assistant in coming months to include joint-filing divorces in cases that involve children.”

Stay informed:

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2018 Bi-Monthly Update Series: May/June

To keep you informed, here are some highlights of changes and updates made to Clicklaw in May and June:

Jan-Feb | Mar-Apr | May-Jun | Jul-Aug | Sep-Oct | Nov-Dec


The Canadian Bar Association, BC Branch (CBA BC)

Many Dial-A-Law scripts have been recently reviewed. For a complete list of these resources, see their listings here (sorted by “last reviewed date”). Some of them are:

Working with Your Legal Aid Lawyer
by Legal Services Society

Now available in French. This fact sheet outlines client and lawyer roles and responsibilities, so each knows what to expect from the legal aid contract.

Gender Self-Determination Project
by PACE Society

A program designed to help trans* folks get proper ID. We work one-on-one with anyone who identifies as trans, two-spirit, non-binary, or otherwise gender-diverse to apply to change their name and/or gender marker and acquire updated IDs. We are able to cover any costs that we cannot get waived by the organizations themselves.

Environmental Legal Aid
by West Coast Environmental Law

West Coast Environmental Law offers free legal advice to help community groups, First Nations and individuals understand their environmental rights. We also offer funding support through our Environmental Dispute Resolution Fund (EDRF), which connects British Columbians with a network of private environmental lawyers around the province willing to work at a legal aid rate.

SFU Centre for Education, Law and Society

The following lesson ideas and educational resources for teachers and students have been reviewed or updated to reflect the new BC curriculum:

Employment Standards Act Reform Project
by British Columbia Law Institute (BCLI)

BCLI has issued a consultation paper on BC’s Employment Standards Act to seek public comment on tentative recommendations for reforming the Act. Responses are requested by 31 August 2018.

Environmental Law Centre, University of Victoria

Submissions on Human Trafficking to Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights
by Pivot Legal Society

Consensual, adult sex work and human trafficking are distinct. Canada’s laws and policies will only be effective if they recognize the difference between these two concepts.

Cannabis in Canada
by the Government of Canada

Information on what you need to know and what the law means for you. Topics include cannabis and the border, cannabis impairment, and how the laws and regulations will impact your business.

Guidance Document – Competitive Advantage: Compliance with PIPA and the GDPR
by Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner for BC (OIPC)

Effective May 25, 2018, some organizations subject to PIPA must also comply with the European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This guidance helps organizations in BC determine whether they are subject to the GDPR and explains how to comply with both PIPA and the GDPR.

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada

  • The Internet of Things
    An introduction to privacy issues with a focus on the retail and home environments.
  • Guidelines for Obtaining Meaningful Consent
    This document sets out practical & actionable guidance regarding what organizations should do to ensure that they obtain meaningful consent. It contains information about the guiding principles for obtaining consent, determining the appropriate form of consent, and the legal requirements.

New & Updated Common Questions

Common Questions help narrow down the resources people should start with. Do you get asked the same questions over and over again by your clients? Send your suggestions to editor[@]clicklaw.bc.ca

Stay informed:

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July 2018 Events (BC-wide, Online)

Bookmark this post! It will be updated as more events are announced. You can also get frequent updates via our Twitter. Have a suggestion? Email us.

  • Friday, July 13 (2:00 – 3:00 pm): Disability Alliance BC presents a free workshop on Registered Disability Savings Plan at RBC Cambie & Broadway, Vancouver.

Under 50? Learn how to open a Registered Disability Savings Plan account and receive up to $1,000 per year. Get more information here.

  • July 14 – 23 (various dates): Seniors First BC presents workshops in Vancouver and Burnaby.
    • Saturday, July 14 (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) Elder Abuse: What Is It? How Do We Deal With It? Workshop (in Mandarin/Cantonese) – 228-2055 Boundary Road, Vancouver. Get more information here.
    • Monday, July 16 (10:00 – 11:45 am) Elder Abuse and Social Connection Workshop – MOSAIC 5575 Boundary Road, Vancouver. Get more information here.
    • Thursday, July 19 (8:00 am – 4:00 pm) Seniors’ Health and Safety Fair – Roundhouse Community Arts & Recreation Centre, 181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver. Get more information here.
    • Friday, July 20 (11:00 am – 12:00 pm) Powers of Attorney, Joint Bank Accounts and Representation Agreements Workshop – South Burnaby Neighbourhood House, 4460 Beresford Street, Burnaby. Get more information here.
    • Monday, July 23 (10:00 – 11:45 am) Elder Abuse and Social Connection Workshop – MOSAIC 5575 Boundary Road, Vancouver. Get more information here.
  • Monday, July 16 (6:00 – 11:30 pm): PovNet presents a burger and beer social at the Morrissey, 1227 Granville Street, Vancouver.

This event is for PovNet members, front line workers, social justice lawyers and all the wonderful people we’ve had the opportunity to work with throughout the year. Come and join us for a burger and beer social at the Morrissey! Please reserve a ticket as soon as possible. Bring colleagues and friends (include them in your ticket numbers or forward them the link to grab their own ticket). Get more info and reserve your ticket here.

  • Friday, July 20 (1:00 – 2:30 pm): Nidus presents a free presentation on Personal Planning at South Granville Seniors Centre, Vancouver.

Are you prepared in case of incapacity, for end-of-life, or for other support needs? Find out about the essential planning documents you can make – to ease the burden on others and avoid the need for government involvement in your personal affairs. No registration is required. Get more information here.

The training program is offered to self-identified women who want to obtain the necessary skills to volunteer for our direct services (intake & crisis line, women’s support groups, court accompaniment, community events, special projects and ongoing training, and more). The training will be held every Friday from September 21st to December 7th, 2018. Get more information by calling Claudia at 604-687-1868 ext. 308 or sending an email to intake@bwss.org.

  • Saturday, July 28 (3:30 – 5:30 pm): QMUNITY presents Trans ID Clinic (Drop-in) at its accessible office in Vancouver.

Qmunity’s Transgender ID Change Clinic provides basic notarial services for low-income transgender individuals who are applying for a legal name change and/or to change gender markers on their identification. To make an appointment, or if you have any questions about the Clinic, please email us at TransID@qmunity.ca. Get more information here.

Stay informed:

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Revitalization of Indigenous law at the ILRU

by an ILRU Master’s Student at UVic Faculty of Law

What is the ILRU?

The Indigenous Law Research Unit (ILRU), housed in UVic’s Faculty of Law, is the only research unit dedicated to the restatement and revitalization of Indigenous law in Canada.

ILRU partners with Indigenous communities, at their request, to articulate their own legal principles and processes, on their own terms, in order to effectively respond to today’s complex challenges. ILRU also works to deepen broader engagement with Indigenous law through the delivery of workshops and development of academic and public legal education resources.

Personal Significance

As a recent graduate from UVic law and now master’s student, this work is significant to me because all of ILRU’s works starts from the position that Indigenous laws are real, are alive, and are capable of being known and publicly applied. Although it is hard to imagine for some, it was not that long ago that Indigenous people could not even hire a lawyer let alone research and promulgate their own laws and traditions.

Roots in Truth and Reconciliation

ILRU has helped stoke the fires of the legal traditions it has worked with since it emerged in 2012 from a national partnership with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) and the Indigenous Bar Association. The first ILRU project had a significant impact on the TRC’s Calls to Action and was so ground-breaking that Indigenous communities began to contact the ILRU directly to request partnerships to research their own laws. Since that time, ILRU has partnered with Indigenous communities on a wide breadth of legal issues and questions. Currently, ILRU is engaged in nine projects ranging from creating Indigenous law curriculum for use in law schools to work that is aimed at examining the principles and processes in an Anishinaabe legal tradition that relate to community governance.

The Joint Degree Program – Juris Indigenarum Doctor (JID) & Juris Doctor (JD)

The JID/JD dual degree is truly groundbreaking. Similar to the position taken by ILRU, the program begins from the understanding that Indigenous laws are real, knowable, and can be critically examined and worked with by both insiders and outsiders. This program is a double degree that will, throughout the four-year program, instruct students on the complete content of a Canadian common law degree and aspects of various Indigenous legal traditions for the purpose of increasing the students’ capacity to work with and within these legal traditions.

Field Schools

One of the most exciting components about the JID/JD program is the field course that students will undertake during their third and fourth years and comprise the entirety of their course load during the semester. During these terms students will, under the close supervision of academic supervisors and community knowledge keepers, learn about a particular Indigenous community’s legal traditions by observing the ways in which their legal processes are applied today. The field schools will also have students work with the specific community on law-related projects. The purpose of these terms is to imbue students with the skills necessary to understand the institutions, sources of law, forms of reasoning, legal principles and procedures within those People’s law(s).

Walking the Walk

The first field course, “C?ELA?N?ENE?*: A Field Course in the Re-emergence of W?SA?NEC? Law Fall 2018” will be offered in Fall 2018 and taught by John Borrows and Rob Clifford. The significance of having the focus of the first field course be W?SA?NEC? law merits specific mention here. The work of reconciliation and revitalization is something that falls on the shoulders of every Canadian citizen and institution. Often times the work can seem overwhelming, too abstract, or any other myriad of sensations as it asks Canadians to grapple with hard truths about our past and present. I ask readers to draw inspiration from what is being undertaken at University of Victoria when dealing with such struggles and look to those closest to you. I am grateful to be a part of an institution that, while understanding the need to be attentive to national and global issues, begins by working with those who have and continue to be directly impacted by the University’s physical presence upon their territories.

*Words may not render properly in RSS and WordPress. Please see the link for the correct rendering.

Stay Informed with the ILRU:

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June 2018 Events (BC-wide, Online)

Bookmark this post! It will be updated as more events are announced. You can also get frequent updates via our Twitter. Have a suggestion? Email us.

  • June 1 – 5 (various dates): the provincial government presents various events as part of Victims and Survivors of Crime Week in Canal Flats, New Westminster, Victoria, Skidegate, and Old Massett. See more details and contact info for each event here (PDF).
    • Friday, June 1 (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Information on services available for victims & survivors of crime – Base Camp Coffee, 4957 Burns Ave., Canal Flats
    • Friday, June 1 Integrated Support for Victims of Sexual Violence Symposium – Justice Institute of British Columbia, 715 McBride Blvd., New
      Westminster
    • Saturday, June 2 (6:35 pm) Domestic Abuse Awareness Project – Royal Athletic Park, 1014 Caledonia Avenue, Victoria
    • Monday, June 4 (6:00 – 8:30 pm) Transforming the Culture (film & discussion) – Haida Heritage Centre Kay Linagaay Sea Lion Town/Skidegate
    • Tuesday, June 5 (6:00 – 8:30 pm) Transforming the Culture (film & discussion) – Tluu Xaadaa Naay Longhouse, Old Masset
  • June 4 – 6 (various dates): Courthouse Libraries BC and Access Pro Bono present two webinars for current and prospective volunteers with Access Pro Bono. Advocates and front-line workers are welcomed to join.
  • June 4 – 28 (various dates): the provincial government’s Rental Housing Task Force is hosting public meetings in 10 locations across BC throughout June.

The Task Force invites rental housing providers, renters, housing advocates, and stakeholders to attend a 3-hour facilitated workshop in their community. They are seeking input to identify solutions and ideas for making recommendations to modernize BC’s tenancy laws and policies. Find the location closest to you and register online here.

  • Tuesday, June 5 (9:30 am – 12:30 pm): Community Legal Assistance Society (CLAS) presents Preventing, Investigating and Responding to Workplace Sexual Harassment at the CLAS office in Vancouver.

This three-hour interactive workshop will help you understand your legal obligations to prevent, investigate and respond to sexual harassment in the workplace. The course is accredited for 3 hours of Continuing Professional Development credit by the Law Society of BC. Workshop fee is $100 per person. If you are a non-profit organization and the fee poses a barrier, please contact us to discuss alternative arrangements. Get more information here (PDF).

  • June 5 – 6 (various dates): Law for Nonprofits presents various workshops in Cranbrook and Vancouver.
    •  Tuesday, June 5 (10:00 am – 12:00 pm MDT) Recordkeeping and Privacy for Non-Profits – College of the Rockies, Cranbrook. Free to non-profit organizations within the West Kootenay/Columbia Basin area. Get more information and register online here.
    • Tuesday, June 5 (1:00 – 3:00 pm MDT) The New Societies Act: What You Need to Know – College of the Rockies, Cranbrook. Free to non-profit organizations within the West Kootenay/Columbia Basin area.  Get more information and register online here.
    • Wednesday, June 6 (9:30 am – 12:00 pm) The New Societies Act: What You Need to Know – the Alliance for Arts + Culture, Vancouver. The fee is $50. City of Vancouver Bursaries available. Get more information and register online here.
    • Wednesday, June 6 (1:30 – 4:00 pm) Employment and Human Rights 101 Workshop – the Alliance for Arts + Culture, Vancouver. The fee is $50. City of Vancouver Bursaries available. Get more information and register online here.
  • June 5 – 13 (various dates): Plan Institute presents information sessions and workshops by phone and in Vancouver.
    • Tuesday, June 5 (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) – Plan Institute Office, Suite 260 – 3665 Kingsway, Vancouver. Cost: free. Register online here.
    • Thursday, June 7 (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Wills, Trusts and Estate Planning Workshop – Plan Institute Office, Suite 260 – 3665 Kingsway, Vancouver. Cost: $65.00 per person or $90.00 for two. Register online here.
    • Wednesday, June 13 (10:00 am – 12:00 pm) Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) – teleseminar by phone/computer. Cost: free. Register online here.
  • June 6 – 7 (various dates): People’s Law School presents two classes on Wills and Estates for the public on the following topics in Burnaby and Port Moody.
  • Tuesday, June 12 (5:00 – 9:00 pm): the Kettle Society presents 2018 Making a Difference Fundraiser at The Permanent, Vancouver.

Come to celebrate The Kettle Society’s inspired mental health work at an evening to benefit our core service programs. Taking place at The Permanent, one of Vancouver’s most stunning heritage spaces, each guest will enjoy a complimentary themed cocktail and delicious food from The Lazy Gourmet. Cocktails and conversation will lead to a performance by The Kettle Choir, and our keynote speaker Lieutenant-General, the Honourable Roméo Dallaire (Ret’d) speaking on Mental Health and Invisible Wounds. Get your tickets here.

Please join us in our new space at 1720 Grant Street to meet our staff and learn about our programs. RSVP info@scyofbc.org.

Celebrate 20 years of welcome, belonging, and opportunity that is Kinbrace Community Society (1998 – 2018). Get more information and register online here.

Join FIPA staff, board, members, and others in the information and privacy community at FIPA’s 2018 Annual General Meeting. The event will feature a talk by Vincent Gogolek who will be reflecting on his time with BC FIPA. Get more information here. To register, send an email to fipa@fipa.bc.ca with your name, email, phone number, and membership status.

  • Wednesday, June 20 (5:45 – 7:00 pm): YWCA Vancouver presents 2018 AGM & Tuning In: Examining Trends on Millennials, Masculinity and Gender Equality at  UBC Robson Square, Vancouver.

Please join us for YWCA Metro Vancouver’s Annual General Meeting. We are excited to welcome Shachi Kurl, Executive Director of the Angus Reid Institute, to deliver a keynote that will examine trends on millennials, masculinity and gender equality. Get more information and register online here.

  • Friday, June 29 (12:30 – 2:00 pm): Disability Alliance BC presents Snack & Chat: Filing Income Taxes – Tips and Benefits at #204 – 456 West Broadway, Vancouver.

Come to DABC’s 3rd Snack and Chat, and learn about income tax filing and the benefits of filing your income taxes. To register, please contact Val at 604-875-0188 or feedback@disabilityalliancebc.org. Lunch will be provided. Get more information here.

Stay informed:

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Visualizing Data for Legal Advocacy

by Peter Kim, Communications & Digital Engagement Manager, Pivot Legal Society

Pivot Legal Society’s mission is to target and remove systemic barriers to justice for communities affected by poverty and social exclusion. We do this through strategic litigation, advocacy, and public education and outreach to empower those affected by homelessness, police violence, people engaged in sex work, and individuals who use substances.

Winning the court of public opinion

As a legal advocacy organization, our most pressing battles to advance the rights of disenfranchised communities are fought in the courtrooms of law; but in today’s digital age, where the flow of information is never-ending, we strive for change in the court of public opinion as well. We do this through our use of data as a powerful visual tool to convey meaning in an accessible manner.

Making sense of data using interactive infographics

Our four campaign areas—sex work, drug policy, homelessness, and police accountability—are richly supported by data sets and research that remains, in large part, inaccessible from mainstream consumption. Pivot translates this information into a meaningful form to enhance its communications campaigns: interactive infographics.

Click on the image to view the interactive infograph
Click on the image to view the interactive infograph

We use data to tell a story, be it the dire urgency of the current overdose epidemic or ways in which police enforcement interferes with public health efforts. Interactive infographics deliver meaning instantly. Where a paragraph of words struggles to convey its message in minutes, a graph or chart can effortlessly deliver meaning within seconds.

 

Click on the image to view the interactive infographic
Click on the image to view the interactive infographic

This is significant because of the way in which people consume information in the social media age. Words alone often fail to register because of shortened attention spans and a propensity to rapidly scroll on our smartphones. We have become an audience spoiled by choice and quantity. Infographics are that visual aid to capture the interest of the easily distracted and draw them in.

 

Click on the image to interact with the graph on Pivot Legal Society's website
Click on the image to interact with the graph on Pivot Legal Society’s website

Increasing online engagement

We have seen a measurable impact in the way our visuals have engaged our online audience. This blog post on the scale of British Columbia’s overdose crisis and harm reduction efforts had an average “time on page” value of 6:38 seconds—an eternity by online standards.

Plotting a harm reduction map

Click on a location to learn more about the site. Zoom in and out to get a better view.

Pivot has created one of the first harm reduction maps of its kind in Canada, plotting the locations of all Health Canada-approved supervised consumption sites and many of the country’s overdose prevention sites. The content has received over 30,000 impressions so far and has been shared with other health service providers.

Using interactive infographics as a tool for legal advocacy

The innovative yet disruptive forces of the internet are forcing industries to evolve. The news media and brick and mortar retail are two such examples where adaptation isn’t an option, but rather an imperative for survival.

To a lesser degree, how we communicate and engage our community of supporters and the public more generally must also adapt to compete in the marketplace of information, already a crowded space where the strength of content alone isn’t enough. Interactive infographics are just one tool we use to give us the edge and help us achieve our strategic objectives to improve the lives of Canada’s most marginalized people.

Stay Informed with Pivot Legal Society:

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2018 Bi-Monthly Update Series: March/April

To keep you informed, here are some highlights of changes and updates made to Clicklaw in March and April:

Jan-Feb | Mar-Apr | May-Jun | Jul-Aug | Sep-Oct | Nov-Dec


Courthouse Libraries BC

New extended hours for Kamloops, Nanaimo, New Westminster locations: Monday to Friday, from 8:30-12:00 pm, 12:30-4:00 pm.

The Canadian Bar Association, BC Branch (CBA BC)

Many Dial-A-Law scripts have been updated. For a complete list of these resources, see their listings here (sorted by “last reviewed date”). Some of the updated scripts are:

Disability Alliance BC

The following resources have been updated:

The help sheets and videos from the series “How I Need to Know” are now available on Clicklaw. The publications provide information for people with disabilities who are victims of crime. See the listings here (sorted in alphabetical order).

Legal Services Society

New and updated publications:

New languages other than English are now available for the following publications:

Parents Legal Centre

The Parents Legal Centre (PLC) provides a lawyer and an advocate to help parents in select locations settle their child protection matters early on and collaboratively (everyone works together). Locations: Surrey and Vancouver.

Nidus

Pivot Legal Society

One of our new contributor organizations have made their resources available on Clicklaw:

Is That Legal? (CyberMisogyny Legal Guide)
by West Coast LEAF

Understanding Canadian law on issues of online harassment, exploitation, & abuse. Now available in Arabic, Chinese (simplified & traditional), Punjabi, and Spanish. Co-published with Legal Services Society.

Strata Property Law—Phase Two
by British Columbia Law Institute (BCLI)

This project is intended to make recommendations to reform the Strata Property Act, in seven identified areas, to help in the development of the next generation of strata-property law in British Columbia.

Environmental Law Centre UVic

Their work on legal issues affecting the environment in BC have been recently added to Clicklaw. See the full listings here and some of their most recent reports below.

Landlord Registry™
by LandlordBC

A program for landlords & building/property managers in BC. For $39 plus tax, enrollees receive access to the e-learning tool I Rent It Right™ and a 3 year access to the online tool kit. This program provides them with fundamental education & best practises in regard to the Residential Tenancy Act.

Property Assessment Appeal Board – Online Dispute Resolution
by the Property Assessment Appeal Board of BC

This new service is available for you to appeal the property assessment of your residential properties. It allows you to have the option to resolve your appeal completely online.

An Evaluation of the Cost of Family Law Disputes: Measuring the Cost Implication of Various Dispute Resolution Methods
by the Canadian Research Institute for Law and the Family

This study describes the results of a survey of family law lawyers and their views of the use of collaborative processes, mediation, arbitration and litigation in family law disputes.

Stay informed:

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