Organization of the Month | February 2017

Introduction to the RSTP

The Refugee Sponsorship Training Program (RSTP) supports groups interested in the Private Sponsorship of Refugees (PSR) Program, through which Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents can engage in the resettlement of refugees.

RSTP works with many different types of sponsoring groups: Sponsorship Agreement Holders (SAHs) and their Constituent Groups (CGs), Groups of Five, and Community Sponsors across Canada (excluding Quebec).

The increase in interest in the PSR program and involvement from the public in the resettlement of Syrian refugees that Canada has witnessed since September 2015 dramatically increased demand for RSTP services. With additional funding support, RSTP has been able to expand its staff and programs to assist sponsors across the country. For the first time, RSTP placed Trainers in Vancouver and Halifax to provide more intensive regional support.

What do we do?

RSTP addresses information and ongoing training needs of private sponsorship groups (PSGs), and the initial information needs of sponsored refugees.

RSTP provides training to sponsorship groups via:

  • Webinar presentations
  • Workshops
  • Information sessions
  • Training manuals and guides
  • Online-based training courses

RSTP keeps sponsors informed about policy updates via:

  • Information sessions
  • E-mail distribution lists
  • the RSTP Website (rstp.ca)

RSTP assists sponsors with their case-specific questions by:

RSTP in Western Canada

The RSTP Trainer in Vancouver, BC works closely with PSGs in Alberta and British Columbia. RSTP’s activities in Western Canada include:

Workshops and Training Sessions

RSTP offers trainings and workshops to ensure that PSGs understand the requirements of the program and the level of commitment needed, assist them with preparing application packages and guide them through the sponsorship process. RSTP emphasizes post-arrival issues that private sponsors may encounter and make sure that they receive the necessary assistance with providing settlement support to sponsored refugees.

Support with case-specific inquiries

RSTP responds to e-mail and telephone inquiries from sponsorship groups in Alberta and BC requesting: assistance with completing application forms, clarification of eligibility requirements, obtaining application updates, and seeking support with finding necessary settlement resources.

Updates and Information Sharing

RSTP keeps abreast of policy developments and changes, including provincial initiatives in BC and AB, and informs sponsorship groups via an e-mail distribution list.

Networking and Outreach

RSTP takes part in community events, networking meetings, roundtable discussions, and other events that focus on refugee protection and resettlement issues.

When and how can I contact RSTP?

Please do not hesitate to contact RSTP if you:

  • Are interested in learning more about Private Refugee Sponsorship program;
  • Would like assistance with completing application forms;
  • Have a case-specific question related to a refugee individual/family whom your group is sponsoring;
  • Would like to get connected to a settlement service provider organization;
  • Have questions about preparing for the long-term and ending sponsorship period; and/or
  • Would like to learn about upcoming workshops, webinars, and other training events offered to private sponsorship groups.

RSTP is funded by Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and administered by Catholic Crosscultural Services (CCS).

RSTP office in Ontario:

55 Town Centre Court, Suite 401 Toronto, ON M1P 4X4 Canada
E-mail: info@rstp.ca
Tel: 416.290.1700; Toll-free: 1.877.290.1701

RSTP Trainer in Western Canada:

Tel: 604.254.9626 ext. 517

 

 

Stay informed with RSTP:

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What is “Unbundling”? An Introduction to the BC Family Law Unbundling Roster

New on the Clicklaw HelpMap is the BC Family Law Unbundling Roster, filled with legal professionals across BC, who offer “unbundled” services.

This listing is managed directly by Roster Staff. To see full profiles for professionals on the list, which contains information about fee structure, supported languages and more, visit the Roster website here.

What are Unbundled Services?

In short, unbundled legal services means clients pay for some assistance depending on: (1) what they want help with and (2) what they can afford.

Most people would like to have the advice and assistance of a family lawyer, but hiring a lawyer to represent them from beginning to end is often too expensive and makes it difficult to predict total costs.

Unlike the traditional full-representation model, a lawyer providing unbundled legal services works on, and charges you for, only those tasks that you agree to in advance. You start by meeting your lawyer and, as a team, make a plan to address your legal problem. The entire matter is broken down into tasks and you choose which tasks you want help with and which ones you will handle on your own. This approach is flexible, and can be adapted to meet your needs including your budget and your comfort level with managing your own legal affairs.

Unbundling is not for everyone. The Roster website has a questionnaire that will help you decide whether it is for you.

What are some examples of Unbundled Services?

For example, if you are representing yourself in court you may want a lawyer’s help with drafting a document or pre-trial advice. If you are resolving your dispute through an out-of-court process like mediation, an unbundled lawyer can provide legal advice before mediation or draft a binding agreement after mediation.

Related Help

Do you know a lawyer or paralegal who is interested in joining?

Send them to this page on the Courthouse Libraries BC website, which offers a Sign Up link to join the BC Family Unbundling Roster, and a toolkit to assist and guide in the provision of unbundled family legal services in a safe and effective way. These core documents have been prepared with the assistance of the Law Society of BC.

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Alert: Impact of US Executive Order on Canadians Travelling to U.S.

On January 27, 2017, the President of the United States signed an Executive Order suspending the entry into the United States of citizens and nationals of seven countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan and Yemen.

The travel prohibition is effective immediately for an initial period of 90 days.

WHO IS AFFECTED?

  • Citizens and nationals of seven countries: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan and Yemen will not be admitted into the United States
  • Dual national Canadian citizens presenting a valid Canadian passport are not subject to an automatic ban
  • Temporary residents in Canada from any of the seven countries will not be admitted into the United States
  • Canadian Permanent Residents from any of the seven countries are at heightened risk of being denied entry and detained if travelling to the United States
  • Temporary residents (including students and temporary foreign workers) in Canada who are from any of the seven countries will not be admitted into the United States

UPDATE

The United States Court District of Massachusetts has granted a temporary restraining order permitting travelers to enter into the Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) who would otherwise not be permitted under the Executive Order. Some airlines have begun boarding travelers of the above seven countries as a result.

RESOURCES

  • EY Mobility: immigration alert – A summary of the impact to Canadians.
  • BCCLA Post: Latest: Canadians and the US Travel Ban – Information on the Safe Third Country Agreement
  • ACLU – The American Civil Liberties Union is among several U.S. organizations that are challenging the executive order in court. They are posting updates of developments, though they may not have Canada-specific information.
  • Islamophobia Hotline (BC Specific) – Free confidential legal advice if you feel that you have been discriminated, harassed, or faced violence because you are Muslim or were perceived to be Muslim.

Stay tuned for further developments.
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Feb. 2017 Events – (Online, Burnaby, Surrey, Vancouver, Victoria)

Bookmark this post! It will be updated as more events are announced. You can also get frequent updates via our Twitter. Have a suggestion? Email us.

Wednesday, February 1 (11:30-12:30pm) Online Webinar: Live Demo of the Personal Planning Registry. Register Online.

Wednesday, February 8 (11:30-12:30pm) Online Webinar: Planning for Health and Personal Care. Register Online.

Wednesday, February 22 (11:30-12:30pm) Online Webinar: Planning for Financial and Legal Matters. Register Online.

  • February 3-16 (Various Times): BCCLA has several events going on this month:logo_bccla

February 3-5 (Various Times) In the wake of tragedy: acting together against Islamophobia includes Vancouver and Victoria in a list of more than 30 communities taking part in vigils to mourn the loss of life that resulted from this act of terrorism.

Wednesday, February 8 (5:00-7:00pm) 2228 Oak Bay Ave, VictoriaVictoria meet-up at the Penny Farthing – Come meet Micheal and Paul, discuss current civil liberties and human rights issues, and find out if you might like to get more involved! RSVP so we know how many snacks to order.

Thursday, February 16 (7:00-8:30pm) Alice McKay Room, Lower Level, Vancouver Public Library – 350 W Georgia St, VancouverPanel – Protecting the Right to Protest: Free Speech versus Corporate Power – The aim of this roundtable discussion is to explore how we can mobilize the media to, among other issues, educate the public for the need to reform the courts to regain citizen rights to free speech and the right to dissent.

Pro Bono lawyers provide a 30-minute free legal consultation on issues related to TFWs on Immigration, Employment, Human Rights & Privacy, Admin-General and Civil Procedure. This service is for low-income migrant workers including: Low-Skilled Workers, Persons under the Live-in Caregiver Program, Agricultural Workers, etc. All clients should book an appointment at least a week before the target Clinic date. Book an appointment with the organizer.

  • February 6-16 (Various Dates): People’s Law School 1004presents the following events in Burnaby and Vancouver:

Monday, February 6 (7:00-8:30pm) Burnaby Public Library – 6100 Willingdon Avenue: Family Law – Child Access and Custody – Contact 604-436-5400 to register.

Tuesday, February 7 (12:00-1:00pm) 900 Howe Street, Vancouver: Currency Fraud – Register Online.

Wednesday, February 8 (7:00-8:30pm) Burnaby Public Library – 7311 Kingsway: Powers of Attorney, Joint Bank Accounts and Representation Agreements – Contact 604-683-4574 to register.

  • Wednesday, February 8 (6:30-8:30pm): Disability Alliance BC dabc_logopromotes a free online webinar from lawyer Ken Kramer, Q.C. on Disability & Estate Planning – Topics: Preparing a Will, Trust planning for persons with disability, Disability and Estate planning
  • February 14-17 (Various Dates): Mediate BC presents the following events in Vancouver:

Tuesday, February 14 (12:00-1:00pm) #150, 900 Howe Street, Vancouver: Games and Other Tools for Intergenerational Conflict Prevention – Register Online. (Part of Mediate BC’s Learn@Lunch Series with People’s Law School)

Wednesday, February 15 (1:30-3:00pm) Barclay Manor, 1447 Barclay Street, Vancouver: Elder Mediation: Maintain Your Voice and Your Choice – Contact 604-669-5051 to register.

Thursday, February 16 (9:30-11:00am) 900 Howe Street, Vancouver: Top 10 Things To Know About Family Mediation – Register Online. (Part of Mediate BC’s Learn@Lunch Series with People’s Law School)

Friday, February 17 (1:00-3:00pm) South Granville Seniors Centre, 1420 West 12th Ave, Vancouver: Collaborative Gaming for Seniors and Families – Drop-in.

  • Wednesday, February 15 (11:30-2:30pm): Pivot Legal Society redzonesforumpresents A Forum on Red Zones: Bail and Sentencing Conditions & Marginalized People in Vancouver at the Japanese Language School Auditorium, 487 Alexander Street, Vancouver in the DTES.

Speakers will present and comment on findings from a study conducted in Vancouver on area restrictions and other conditions and lead a discussion with participants. Free lunch will be served.

The BC Society Act, which provides the rules for governance and incorporation of non-profits, officially proclaimed important changes on November 28, 2016. There will be a two year transition period by which time all societies in BC will have to make the switch to the new Act. This workshop will provide the information on the bylaw and policy changes necessary for your organization to effectively make the transition when the new Act is proclaimed.

Register Online. Tickets are $50.

  • Monday, February 20 (6:00-8:00pm): National Self-Represented-Litigants Support Network meets in Vancouver. The group offers free support for individuals going through the difficult experience of representing themselves in family or civil court. Held at the Westcoast Child Care Resource Centre at 2772 East Broadway, Vancouver. Free Parking available. RSVP to NSSN.vancouver@gmail.com.

Stay informed:

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Organization of the Month | January 2017

by Kathleen Cunningham
Executive Director

BC Law Institute Turns 20

bcli_20th_pic
Lisa A. Peters, Q.C., Chair of the BCLI Board and The Honourable Suzanne Anton Q.C. at #BCLI20

The BC Law Institute (BCLI) is British Columbia’s only independent, non-partisan law reform body. It includes the Canadian Centre for Elder Law.

Over the past 20 years BCLI has produced over 60 reports, study papers and resources. Our reports include detailed analyses of the evolution of a particular law, consider the policy issues and recommend reforms to improve the law and/or make it more relevant in today’s society. Our study papers examine legal issues and often identify areas of the law that might be the subject of a future project.

What’s happening in 2017

In 2017 we have a number of ambitious and interesting projects on the go – we continue our projects to address issues in BC’s strata property law, reform the Employment Standards Act and reform the Builders Lien Act. We are also working on a study paper on the options available for financing litigation when individuals must go to court to protect their rights. Finally, we are in the final stages of a project of the Uniform Law Conference of Canada which will propose a Uniform Vital Statistics Act that could be adopted in all provinces and territories to modernize and help ensure better consistency across the country in how vital events are recorded.

Celebrating 20 Years: Thank You.

We could not do the work we do without the support of hundreds of committee volunteers (over 370) and dozens of funders.  In January 2017, the BC Law Institute turned 20. We kicked off a year of celebration with an event in Victoria to both celebrate our achievements, but to also thank the many funders, supporters and committee volunteers who make it possible for our small team to do the work it does.

Guests were the first to see our 20th Anniversary video “Tending to our Laws” which is now available on our website on this web page. Thank you to our core funders – the Law Foundation of BC and the BC Ministry of Justice, all of our project funders, and to the sponsors of our 20th anniversary events – Gold Sponsor: Lawson Lundell; Silver Sponsors: BC Ministry of Justice, Spraggs & Co, Solvere; and Bronze Sponsor: Ramsay Lampman and Rhodes. Your support makes our work possible.


Q&A with the ED

CQ_iconKathleen Cunningham is the Executive Director of the BC Law Institute. BCLI is one of our top contributors to the Reform & Research section of Clicklaw, which serves as a public window to legal reform and innovations in BC. Here is a short Q&A we did to help you better understand what BCLI does:

I imagine some of our readership might be unfamiliar with BCLI. Could you tell me more about what you do? The laws that govern our lives are established in legislation and through the courts over time. The BCLI identifies laws that are outdated or need to be improved in order to better serve British Columbians.

The resources we produce assist lawyers and other professionals. They range from questions and answers on pension division on the breakdown of a relationship to understanding and addressing undue influence on a client who is making a will or a power of attorney. Many resources are designed to help health care professionals, seniors serving groups, and seniors themselves to understand elder abuse and how to prevent it, and respond when it occurs.

How is BCLI a unique organization? We’re BC’s only independent, non-partisan law reform body. We look to find the laws that are not working for people, and when we identify an area of the law that needs reform, we make sure government and other stakeholders are also interested in seeing work to identify how to improve this area of the law.

How do you identify these areas of need, the laws that “aren’t working”? We invite people to send ideas to us through email, and lawyers that know about us will bring ideas to us; we’ve had a number of projects brought to us this way – our Strata Property law reform project was brought to us by the Notaries of BC, we have an Employment Standards Act project that was brought to us by a lawyer who works in that area, so it can vary. We also monitor what’s being said: what are the courts talking about? What are the commentators discussing when court decisions come out?

Continue reading

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2016 Bi-monthly Update Series: November/December

In our 2015 year-end update, we promised to provide bimonthly updates to new resources and services added to Clicklaw in those two months. This post concludes our 2016 series with a glimpse into some of the changes and updates made in November and December. We plan to continue these updates into 2017.

Jan-Feb | Mar-Apr | May-Jun | Jul-Aug | Sep-Oct | Nov-Dec


RDSP Helpline
by PLAN Institute

The Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) is a Canada-wide registered matched savings plan specific for people with disabilities. This helpline will help answer questions about the RDSP and the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) pre-requisite.

Civil Resolution Tribunal (CRT): Small Claims Solution Explorer
by Civil Resolution Tribunal

The Solution Explorer is a tool for helping people manage and resolve disputes in BC. It’s now available to beta test for small claims problems. The beta version won’t let you make a claim with the CRT yet. Use it to find free legal information and tools about small claims matters.

Common Question: Can I get a legal order to keep an abuser away from me?

Effective December 5, 2016, the Ministry of Justice will coordinate the service of protection orders under the Family Law Act, when the order is issued without the respondent (i.e. abuser) in court. This is to ensure that the inability to hire a process server does not hinder service. This will be in effect for one year, and may be extended for two additional one-year periods, at the discretion of the Ministry. Read more at the Common Question page.

Common Question: I’ve been turned down for PWD benefits. What can I do?

If the Ministry has turned down your application for the Persons with Disabilities (PWD) benefit, you have the right to appeal. You have 20 business days, from the day you receive the letter telling you that your application has been rejected, to give the Ministry your reconsideration request. You must get the reconsideration request form from a Ministry of Social Development & Social Innovation (MSDSI) office. Read more at the Common Question page.

Housing Help Guide
by Justice Education Society of BC

A series of information sheets about legal questions around housing. The help guides includes topics such as: Being a Tenant, Discrimination and Renting, Buying a House, Selling your House and Foreclosure.

MyLawBC: I’ve been served with a court document pathway
by Legal Services Society

This guided pathway will help you figure out what to do next if you’ve been served with (given) court documents in a family law case. It will lead you to the best available resources for your particular situation, including online self-help guides or in-person services.

Guide to the Law of Protests in British Columbia
by McGrady & Company

This guide informs you of your rights when dealing with the police at public demonstrations. It is designed to help you exercise your right to engage in nonviolent civil disobedience, and avoid committing any criminal offence. It is also designed to assist you in the event you are arrested.

Filing Guide: How to file a Transition Application in Societies Online
by BC Registry Services

A step-by-step guide to the Societies Act Transition Application.

Stay informed:

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Jan. 2017 Events – (Online, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Ladysmith, New Westminster, Vancouver, Victoria)

Bookmark this post! It will be updated as more events are announced. You can also get frequent updates via our Twitter. Have a suggestion? Email us.

You will learn about how to meet the residency obligation and renewing PR cards, steps to becoming a citizen, key points on sponsorship of spouses and parents, changes to the Caregiver program, the 4 year cap on TFWs, and about the Express Entry program.

Register Online or by Phone at 604-436-5400.

How can you plan for incapacity, end-of-life, and other support needs? Learn about Representation Agreements – the only legal document in BC to plan for health care and personal care matters. Find out about other documents being used and promoted in the health system – are they legal? What do they mean for patients and their families?

Register Online.

Wednesday, January 11 (10:30-11:30am) 1-380 Cook Street, Victoria: Elder Abuse: What Is It? How Do We Deal With It? Workshop – Contact 250-384-6542 to register.

Thursday, January 12 (1:00-3:00pm) 620-8th Street, New Westminster: Frauds and Scams Workshop – Contact 604-519-1066 to register.

Friday, January 13 (12:30-2:00pm) 1022 Nelson Street, Vancouver: Government Benefits for Older Adults Workshop – Contact 604-683-4574 to register.

Tuesday, January 17 (1:30-3:30pm) 630-2nd Ave, Ladysmith: Government Benefits for Older Adults Workshop – Contact 250-245-3079 to register.

Wednesday, January 25 (9:30-11:00am) 1200 Glen Pine Court, CoquitlamGovernment Benefits for Older Adults Workshop – Contact 604-927-6940 to register.

Enduring Powers of Attorney or a Representation Agreement with authority for routine finances are legal documents in BC adults may use to plan for incapacity, end-of-life, and other support needs. If there are no arrangements in place, adults can lose their rights through adult guardianship, called Committeeship in BC. Find out how adult guardianship is the LAST RESORT in BC. Also learn about the limits of a Power of Attorney and Bank Power of Attorney.

Register Online.

Evan Kelly, Senior Communications Advisor, Better Business Bureau will lead this session on: how to spot the scammers, how to protect your identity, and what to do if you are scammed.

Register Online.

Join for a fun and participatory seminar on: The dynamics of family conflict; How to approach difficult conversations; Tools for dealing with tension and conflict while building agreements; Where to find support from conflict resolution professionals and other specialists.

Register Online.

All organizations that are incorporated under the current Society Act must plan to complete their “transition application,” with revised constitution and bylaws, by the time of their 2017 AGM. This workshop will provide the information on the bylaw and policy changes necessary for your organization to effectively make the transition when the new Act is proclaimed.

Register Online.

Stay informed:

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Common Questions 2016 Update

What are Common Questions (CQs)?

Clicklaw links to so many great resources, which can make it difficult to decide which one to read first. Clicklaw’s Common Questions are like an extended legal FAQ. They help narrow down the resources people should start with. We are currently working on reviewing and updating our 160 questions.

An example of a Common Question:

renting_rights

In the last 30 days, these 5 CQs received over 4000 views:

Some of our new or updated questions are:

  • Can I get a legal order to keep an abuser away from me? Updated: Effective December 5, 2016, the Ministry of Justice will coordinate the service of protection orders under the Family Law Act, when the order is issued without the respondent (i.e. abuser) in court. This is to ensure that someone’s (your) inability to hire a process server does not hinder service.
  • I think I was sexually harassed. What can I do? This common question directs you to information resources, as well as to the BC Human Rights Clinic that can provide help to resolve your issue.
  • What does the new Societies Act require? The new Societies Act is in force as of November 28, 2016. Pre-existing societies have a two-year transition period to come into compliance with the new act. There are numerous helpful resources and services to help you transition.
  • Is marijuana legal in BC? Not for recreational use. Possession of marijuana is a criminal offense across Canada, under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. This common question explains the exceptions, and has information on the Canadian government’s Task Force on Marijuana Legalization and Regulation.

Do you have an idea for a Common Question?

Do you get asked the same questions over and over again by your clients? Send your suggestions to: editor[@]clicklaw.bc.ca

Stay informed:

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Dec. 2016 – Events (Vancouver, Victoria, Burnaby)

Bookmark this post! It will be updated as more events are announced. You can also get frequent updates via our Twitter. Have a suggestion? Email us.

  • Thursday, December 1 (10:00-11:30am): Nidus is hosting an event at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, 1440 W. 12th Ave (at Hemlock), 2nd floor, Vancouver, to wrap up Personal Planning Month. The Essentials of a Basic Plan for Your Future: What are the key legal documents in BC to plan for incapacity, end-of- life and after death? Who gets copies and where do you register your plans so they are available when needed?
    • This presentation will provide an overview of Representation Agreements, Enduring Powers of Attorney, and Wills. Find out where to get the legal forms and how to register them after they are completed. There will be time for Q & A. Registration is not required.

 

  • Saturday, December 3 (4:00-6:00pm): BCCLA is promoting the Public Town Hall for Consultation on National Security at the SFU Vancouver Morris J. Wosk Conference Centre, 580 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. Participants are logo_bcclaencouraged to register in advance via ps.nsconsultationvancouver-consultationsnvancouver.sp@canada.ca.
    • BCCLA writes: We have an unprecedented opportunity for Canadians to weigh in on the recent radical changes to our national security landscape (eg. “C-51”) and our long-standing deficits in national security transparency and accountability. Now is the time to make our voices heard.

 

  • Monday, December 5 (12:00-1:30pm): Executive Directors Series: Auditing – Lunch and Learn, at the Volunteer Victoria Learning Centre, 306-620 View Street, Victoria. Have you ever wondered about the differences between an audit and financial reporting to funders?
    • The new Societies Act requires all “reporting societies” to appoint an auditor – but what is the role of an auditor; in what ways can an auditor help; and what do you need to know about choosing an auditor. Join Richard Games as he explores the benefits to stakeholders of an audit and answers your questions regarding financial statement audits in this free lunch and learn. Get Tickets here.

 

  • Monday, December 12 (7:00-8:30pm): People’s Law School and Burnaby Public Library are partnering to put on a session about Common-Law Relationships: Learn about your rights and responsibilities before moving in together. After living with someone you can be considered a spouse or common-law partner after a certain amount of time.
    • Join family law lawyer Kevin Quong as he explains laws regarding common-law relationships and how to protect yourself and other family members. This free information session is presented in partnership with People’s Law School. Registration is required and space is limited. Please register online or phone the Bob Prittie Metrotown Branch at 604-436-5400.

Stay informed:

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Societies Act – November 28, 2016

s-act_thumbThe new Societies Act is in force today. It replaces the old Society Act.

Resources for you:

Stay informed:

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